Did you know?

Map 300.1Increasingly, Worthington Schools is a great place to raise our children so that they don’t just survive in a diverse global society, but so that they are prepared to thrive!

Did you know?

Worthington students come from 57 different language backgrounds that we can identify and 114 other languages.  The top native languages in Worthington in order are: English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, Portuguese, Somali, Telugu, Hindi, Tamil, Twi, Japanese, Russian, Vietnamese, Mandingo, Akan, French, Greek, Turkish, Creole, Korean, Bengali, and others….

Did you know?

1407 Worthington students come from families that speak languages other than English as their native languages.

Did you know?

700 Worthington students were born outside of the United States.  Those 700 students come from over 86 different countries. The top native countries in order are United States, India, China, Mexico, Ghana, Brazil, Iraq, Venezuela, Japan, Jordan, Nigeria, Guatemala, Canada, Vietnam, Cameroon, and others….

Did you know?

622 Worthington students qualify under the State of Ohio’s English Language Learner guidelines.

Many people view Worthington from an external lens as a homogeneous upper-middle-class suburb.  We are an upper-middle-class suburb but we are anything but homogeneous and that’s one of the great things about Worthington Schools in 2019!

-Trent Bowers, Superintendent

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The Power of Performance

lipIt’s musical weekend in Worthington Schools.  Both Worthington Kilbourne (Seussical the Musical) and Thomas Worthington (Children of Eden) will present their musical productions Friday and Saturday.  We have amazingly talented student performers in Worthington, and if you missed Hamilton in Columbus over the past three weeks, you won’t want to miss either of these performances.

In Worthington, we put a high value on the arts.  We believe that a public school district is about academics.  However, it’s also about much, much more and providing students opportunities outside the classroom to perform, compete, debate, etc…are all important to the development of our students.  In Worthington, we refer to this as a Both/And approach.

Yesterday morning I had the opportunity to see this approach in action as I attended the annual Colonial Hills Lip-Sync.  6th graders from Colonial Hills practiced intently with music teacher Gretchen Wessel for months. Wednesday night and yesterday morning the students presented 14 different acts that made me smile, clap along, and at one point, cry a few tears of joy.

Having lived in Worthington for the past 14 years and having worked in Worthington Schools now for 11 years, I have had the privilege of watching some of our students grow up.  Today I watched a student whom I’ve known since the day he was born. I thought back to pre-school where he went a full year without speaking to anyone in class. I thought back to 3rd grade where he would refuse to go to school because of his social anxiety.  Today I watched him on stage leading a performance, singing and dancing in full view of everyone. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing.

When I sent a text to his parents about the performance, they replied with words that made me proud to work with the people I get to in Worthington.  They said, “It’s hard to imagine this is the same kid that once needed to be dragged into school due to his social anxiety. It’s a testament to the amazing staff at Colonial Hills.  Can’t say enough about how much John Blaine, Gretchen Wessel, Deidre Rippel, and others contributed to pouring into our son and allowing him to be able to LOVE doing something like this.”

Academics matter in a public school district.  With that said, opportunities outside of academics sometimes matter just as much.  

-Trent Bowers, Superintendent

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Worthington on Wall St.

Fearless_Girl_NYSE.1543425006In November our community voted 70% in favor of passing Issue 9 which was a 2.58 mil bond issue that will fund phase one of our master facilities plan and will also fund general improvements such as buses, technology, band instruments, roofs, boilers, chillers, etc…

Thus, I’ve been reading the Wall Street Journal, watching CNBC and talking to my friends on Wall Street.  When a community passes a bond issue they are actually providing the school district the authority to issue debt and to tax school district residents to pay off that debt over a period of time.  Our school district bonds are municipal bonds which are loans investors make to local governments. They are issued by cities, states, counties, or other local governments. For that reason, the interest they pay on the bonds is usually tax-free.  As the borrowing organization, we promise to pay the bond back at an agreed-upon date. Until then, we make the agreed-upon interest payments to the bondholder.

Municipal bonds are securities. That means the original owner may sell them to other investors on the secondary market. The price can change even though the interest rate never does.

Our bonds are general obligation bonds and not secured by any assets. Instead, general obligation bonds are backed by the “full faith and credit” of the issuer (Worthington Schools), which has the power to tax residents to pay bondholders.

Last week our Treasurer Jeff McCuen, Assistant Treasurer TJ Cusick and I, worked with RBC Bank to actually sell the bonds.  Selling the bonds is the process of packaging the debt into chunks that investors purchase. When they purchase our bonds they are essentially lending our community money.  This process is important because the better we package the bonds the lower interest rate we have to pay and thus the less tax money we have to actually collect from our community.

I’m happy to share that we had a very successful sale last week.  We’ve structured our debt to see a drop in millage for phase two of the master facilities plan and another drop around the time we would ask the community to support phase three of the master facilities plan.  As millage drops off (debt is paid off) over time if the community approves we can issue more debt to fund future projects while requesting less of a tax increase from the community.

We’re thankful to be in a community that supports the capital needs of educating our students.  We’ve sold our bonds and we’re moving forward!

-Trent Bowers, Superintendent

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